Product Name

Description

Additional information - paragraph 1

Additional information - paragraph 2

Mohs Hardness Scale

 

Mohs scale of mineral hardness is named after the scientist, Friedrich Mohs, who invented a scale of hardness based on the ability of one mineral to scratch another. Rocks are made up of one or more minerals.

 

According to the scale, Talc is the softest: it can be scratched by all other materials. Gypsum is harder: it can scratch talc but not calcite, which is even harder. The hardness of a mineral is mainly controlled by the strength of the bonding between the atoms and partly by the size of the atoms. It is a measure of the resistance of the mineral to scratching.

 

Our opals have a hardness of 4 and are easily sanded using silicon carbine (carborundum) or aluminum oxide (corundum) sand paper, which has a hardness of 9.0. They are durable and provide an excellent surface to polish and/or finish. Available in nine colors: Marina (blue); Viper (green); Krakatoa (light gray), Confetti (purple), Dragon's Eye (red), Marianas (dark blue), Moonbeam (white), Sahara (yellow), and Shadow (dark gray). 

"Mohs scale of mineral hardness." Wikipedia, The Free Encyclopedia. 12 Jun 2017, 12:47 UTC.

26 Sep 2017, 18:25      

Mohs Hardness.jpg
ring wood Koa finished.jpg

Example image with dark background

CERAMIC CROPPED.jpg

Example image with light background

WARNING

 

Drilling, sawing, sanding or machining wood products can expose you to wood dust, a substance known to the State of California to cause cancer. Avoid inhaling wood dust or use a dust mask or other safeguards for personal protection. For more information go to www.P65Warnings.ca.gov/wood.

Cancer & Reproductive Harm - www.P65Warnings.ca.gov

bello_opal_logo_R_.jpg